The Next Four Years: What Congress and Obama Can Do on Climate Change

Featuring Congressman Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Eric Pooley, Senior Vice President at the Environmental Defense Fund; Vicki Arroyo, Director of the Georgetown Climate Center; and Bill Becker, Executive Director of the Presidential Climate Action Project 

Tuesday, December 4, 2012
The Mott House, Capitol Hill
122 Maryland Avenue NE, Washington, DC, 20002
9:30a.m.-11:00a.m., breakfast and refreshments served

President Obama has said it: “climate change is real, it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions, and…we’ve got an obligation to future generations to do something about it.”

So now what?

What and how much can really be accomplished, either by the administration or in Congress, in the next four years? “A great deal,” posits science writer Chris Mooney, who will be hosting a thought-provoking panel discussion on the topic next week as part of the ongoing briefing series, Climate Desk Live.

Join Climate Desk next Tuesday, December 4, when Congressman Ed Markey (D-Mass.), top Democrat on the Natural Resources Committee and author of the only climate legislation to pass a chamber of Congress; Eric Pooley, author of The Climate War and Senior Vice President at the Environmental Defense Fund; Vicki Arroyo, Director of the Georgetown Climate Center; and Bill Becker, Director of the Presidential Climate Action Project discuss what likely can, will, and won’t get done. The speakers will outline concrete steps that Congress and the Obama administration can take in the next four years to make significant progress on climate change.

Please RSVP to this space-limited, invitation-only event by Friday, November 30 to CDL@climatedesk.org.

For those unable to attend in person, a live stream will be available at climatedesk.org.

For more information on Climate Desk please visit our FAQ.

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About Climate Desk

The Climate Desk is a journalistic collaboration dedicated to exploring the impact—human, environmental, economic, political—of a changing climate. The partners are The Atlantic, Center for Investigative Reporting, Grist, The Guardian, Huffington Post, Mother Jones, Slate, and Wired.