Can Drastic New Anti-Pollution Rules Help Clean Up Beijing’s Air?

There could be a “silver lining” to the smog.
Melosh/Flickr

Melosh/Flickr

The air quality in Beijing has grown so bad that it’s begun to produce its own catch-22s. All that smog is starting to keep tourists away, but tourism is just the kind of less energy-intensive industry that China needs to develop. The city is hoping to ramp up its public bike-share system, in an effort to shift a majority of trips through the city center onto public transportation. But who would want to ride a bike in this atmosphere?

At least one perverse consequence could be helping. The pollution has gotten so awful that residents and officials long averse to addressing greenhouse gas emissions (at the expense of economic growth) are now clamoring for drastic solutions to its related problem: unbreathable air. As The New York Times reported over the weekend in a piece on the “silver lining” to China’s smog:

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